Understand Your Options

There are countless weight-loss options available. Finding the right bariatric surgery solution that will help you meet your weight-loss goals, provide the flexibility you need when “life happens,” and help keep you on the path to long-term health is hard.

The Lap-Band® Program has decades of proven success and provides the choice and control you are looking for.

The Lap-Band

Safest and Reversible

During the Lap-Band Procedure, a Gastric Band is placed around your stomach in the course of a minimally invasive, outpatient laparoscopic surgery. The band limits the amount of food you can eat to help you feel full sooner and longer. The Lap-Band is both removable and adjustable—when your needs change, it changes. Even if you are considering other bariatric surgeries, start your weight-loss journey with Lap‑Band.

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The Lap-Band

Safest and Reversible

During the Lap-Band Procedure, a Gastric Band is placed around your stomach in the course of a minimally invasive, outpatient laparoscopic surgery. The band limits the amount of food you can eat to help you feel full sooner and longer. The Lap-Band is both removable and adjustable—when your needs change, it changes. Even if you are considering other bariatric surgeries, start your weight-loss journey with Lap‑Band.

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Sleeve Gastrectomy

Partial Stomach “Amputation”

Sleeve Gastrectomy removes 80% of the stomach,1 and what’s left behind is roughly the size of a banana. This helps patients lose weight by limiting the capacity of their stomachs; however, this bariatric surgery is irreversible and involves cutting and stapling of the stomach.2 Patients who undergo a sleeve gastrectomy are at risk for malnutrition and require long-term supplements and vitamins to avoid possible deficiencies.

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Sleeve Gastrectomy

Partial Stomach “Amputation”

Sleeve Gastrectomy removes 80% of the stomach,1 and what’s left behind is roughly the size of a banana. This helps patients lose weight by limiting the capacity of their stomachs; however, this bariatric surgery is irreversible and involves cutting and stapling of the stomach.2 Patients who undergo sleeve gastrectomy are at risk for malnutrition and require long-term supplements and vitamins to avoid possible deficiencies.

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Gastric Bypass

Cuts and Re-routes Organs

Gastric bypass is a restrictive procedure that limits the capacity of your stomach and alters the way nutrients are absorbed. It not only reduces the size of your stomach, but it also reroutes your small intestines and digestive tract. Hundreds of staples are used in this procedure.3 Patients who undergo gastric bypass are at risk for malnutrition and require long-term supplements and vitamins to avoid possible deficiencies.

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Gastric Bypass

Cuts and Re-routes Organs

Gastric bypass is a restrictive procedure that limits the capacity of your stomach and alters the way nutrients are absorbed. It not only reduces the size of your stomach, but it also reroutes your small intestines and digestive tract. Hundreds of staples are used in this procedure.3 Patients who undergo gastric bypass are at risk for malnutrition and require long-term supplements and vitamins to avoid possible deficiencies.

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Gastric Bypass

The Lap-Band Procedure

Sleeve Gastrectomy


Quick Glance—Bariatric Surgery Comparison

Key Benefits of Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding4
Laparoscopic Adjustable
Gastric Banding

(e.g., Lap-Band)
Sleeve Gastrectomy Gastric Bypass
Degree of invasiveness Least invasive (same-day discharge possible)

Does not alter anatomy
Requires hospital stay (with quicker recovery than gastric bypass)

Removes 80% of the stomach
Requires hospital stay

Reduces stomach size and reroutes digestive tract, which alters the food pathway
Risk of postoperative complications Lowest rate of postoperative complications Lower risk of complications due to one-step procedure Highest risk of complications due to two-step surgery
Mortality risk Lowest mortality rate (.006%)5 Lower mortality risk than gastric bypass but higher than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (0.3%-2%)6 Higher mortality risk than sleeve gastrectomy or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (0.3%-2%)7
Risk of vitamin and mineral deficiencies Lowest risk of vitamin and mineral deficiencies Similar issues with maintaining adequate nutrient stores as compared to gastric bypass; latest research supports similar supplementation needs that are more in line with gastric bypass needs8,9 Potential long-term vitamin and mineral deficiencies especially deficits in vitamin B12, iron, calcium, and folate, which requires higher levels/doses of supplements to maintain adequate nutrient stores8,9
Adjustability Adjustable Can’t be adjusted Can’t be adjusted
Reversibility Reversible Can’t be reversed Difficult, but can be reversed
Cost Least expensive option10 Similar to gastric bypass10 Similar to sleeve gastrectomy10

Control Hunger, Control Weight

The Lap-Band Procedure is minimally invasive and laparoscopic.

A few small incisions (1.5-2.5 cm each) are made on the abdomen, where your surgeon will use a tiny camera and long, thin medical instruments to operate and navigate. A Gastric Band is placed around the stomach to limit the amount of food that can be eaten at once helping control portions and promote your feeling of fullness. And once inserted, the Lap-Band can be adjusted or removed to meet new weight goals or major life events—like pregnancy.

Why 1,000,000 People Chose Lap‑Band11

The Lap-Band Program has been proven to be the best choice for many patients looking for a minimally invasive solution for significant weight loss. A survey of 1,000+ respondents indicated that they were 13 times more likely to choose the Gastric Band over Gastric Bypass surgery options.12 The reasons why are clear.

The Lap-Band…
  • Delivers the Adjustability That Puts You in Control
    A minimally invasive, reversible procedure places the band around your stomach to help reduce the amount of food that you can eat at one time. You can adjust the band as your needs change.
  • Does Not Restrict Food Choice
    You can continue to eat the healthy foods you love, maintain portion control, and ditch the expensive supplements.
  • Delivers Significant Results in 1 Year
    Lap-Band Patients with a lower BMI lose an average of 65% of their excess weight in the first year and 70% in the second year.13
  • Leads to Life-Changing Transformations
    On average, patients kept off 60% of their excess body weight after 5 years of having the Lap-Band.14
  • Supports Renewed Health
    Weight loss from the Lap-Band Program has been proven to resolve or improve serious obesity-related health conditions in many people, including Type II Diabetes, Hypertension, Asthma, Sleep Apnea, and GERD.15-17

The Human Factor—A Team Dedicated to Your Success

The Lap-Band System is an important tool in helping you lose excess weight, but maximizing your weight loss requires a healthy lifestyle. The key to sustained healthy behaviors is personalized support from the right team. Your Lap-Band Surgeon will provide you with the knowledge and practices that will help you make the most of your Lap-Band Program.
Genuine care and personalized support will help you along your journey, especially if you are having a difficult time physically or emotionally. Your team will help you overcome obstacles and reach your weight-loss goals.
Important Lap-Band® System Safety Information

The Lap-Band System is indicated for weight reduction for patients with obesity, with a Body Mass Index (BMI) of at least 40 kg/m2 or a BMI of at least 30 kg/m2 with one or more obesity-related comorbid conditions. It is indicated for use only in adult patients who have failed more conservative weight reduction alternatives, such as supervised diet, exercise and behavior modification programs. Patients who elect to have this surgery must make the commitment to accept significant changes in their eating habits for the rest of their lives.

The Lap-Band System is not recommended for non-adult patients, patients with conditions that may make them poor surgical candidates or increase the risk of poor results, who are unwilling or unable to comply with the required dietary restrictions, or who currently are or may be pregnant.

The Lap-Band System is a long-term implant. Explant and replacement surgery may be required. Patients who become pregnant or severely ill, or who require more extensive nutrition may require deflation of their bands. Anti-inflammatory agents, such as aspirin, should be used with caution and may contribute to an increased risk of band erosion.

Placement of the Lap-Band System is major surgery and, as with any surgery, death can occur. Possible complications include the risks associated with the medications and methods used during surgery, the risks associated with any surgical procedure, and the patient’s ability to tolerate a foreign object implanted in the body. Most common related adverse events include: Band slippage, pouch dilation, stoma obstruction, gastroesophageal reflux, esophageal dilation, cholelithiasis, incisional infection, abdominal pain, gastroenteritis, or nausea and vomiting may occur. Reoperation may be required. Rapid weight loss may result in complications that may require additional surgery. Deflation of the band may alleviate excessively rapid weight loss or esophageal dilation.

Important: For full safety information please click here or talk with your doctor.
CAUTION: Rx only.

References
  • ASMBS Bariatric Surgery Procedures: Sleeve Gastrectomy. https://asmbs.org/patients/bariatric-surgery-procedures#sleeve
  • Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy | MedlinePlus [Online]. Available: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007435.htm. [Accessed: December 13, 2016].
  • Gastric Bypass Surgery | MedlinePlus [Online]. Available: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007199.htm. [Accessed: December 13, 2016].
  • Let’s Talk About the C-word: Reducing Cancer Risk Through Weight-Loss Surgery By Ahmad Bali, M.D., Bali Surgical, Charleston, WV.
  • ASMBS Informed Consent for Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Band
  • ASMBS Informed Consent for Informed Consent for Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass
  • ASMBS Informed Consent for Laparoscopic Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy
  • Parrott, Frank, Rabena, Craggs-Dino, Isom, Greiman. American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Integrated Health Nutritional Guidelines for the Surgical Weight Loss Patient 2016 Update: Micronutrients. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases. 13 (2017) 727–741.
  • Clinical Practice Guidelines for The Perioperative Nutrition, Metabolic, and Nonsurgical Support of Patients Undergoing Bariatric Procedures – 2019 Update: Cosponsored by American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists/American College of Endocrinology, The Obesity Society, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, Obesity Medicine Association, and American Society of Anesthesiologists. AACE/TOS/ASMBS/OMA/ASA 2019 Guidelines
  • “Which Weight-Loss Surgery Is Best?” Serena Gordon, Nourish by WebMD. https://www.webmd.com/diet/obesity/news/20181030/which-weight-loss-surgery-is-best#1
  • Data on file. ReShape Lifesciences Inc.
  • Obesity News Today. (July 7, 2015). “Survey Reveals That While Weight Loss Surgery Still Not Common, Gastric Bands Are Most Favored Option.” Retrieved from https://obesitynewstoday.com/2015/07/07/consumer-survey-reveals-gastric-surgery-is-not-a-common-choice/.
  • Robert Michaelson, Diane K. Murphy, Todd M. Gross, and Scott M. Whitcup. LAP-BAND® for Lower BMI: 2-Year Results from the Multicenter Pivotal Study. Obesity (2013) 21:1148–1158
  • Ray James, Ray Shahla. Safety, efficacy, and durability of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding in a single surgeon U.S. community practice. Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.
  • Dixon John, Chapman Leon, O’Brien Paul. Marked Improvement in Asthma After Lap-Band Surgery for Morbid Obesity. Obesity Surgery. 1999.
  • Dixon John, O’Brien Paul. Health Outcomes of Severely Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects 1 Year After Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding. Diabetes Care, Volume 25, Number 2. February 2002.
  • Dixon John, Schachter Linda, O’Brien Paul. Sleep Disturbances and Obesity: Change Following Surgically Induced Weight Loss. Arch Intern Med/Vol 161. Jan 8, 2001.